“Jimi Hendrix: Electric Church” Documentary is coming!


Screengrab via "Electric Church" Trailer


“Jimi Hendrix: Electric Church” Documentary Featuring Paul McCartney, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, & More Coming To Theaters soon.

The 2017 documentary film about Jimi Hendrix‘s July 4th, 1970 performance in front of 300,000 music fans at the Atlanta International Pop Festival will groove its way to movie theaters across the country beginning later this month and continue into the spring. The film debuted on Showtime back in January 2017, and has since been released on home media. The film was directed by John McDermott, and features a mix of archival footage from the 1970 event, which is considered by many as the last of the great pop festivals from that era. Hendrix would tragically die at the age of 27 only a month-and-a-half following the event on September 18th, 1970.

The 89-minute film features interviews with Hendrix’s former bandmates, Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell, in addition to notable artists including Paul McCartney, Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Rich Robinson, Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, and some of the famous guitarist’s sound engineers including acclaimed rock producer Eddie Kramer and Abe Jacob.

The film will begin its theatrical tour (in total rock and roll fashion) on January 31st with screenings at Arc Light Hollywood in Los Angeles and IFC Theatre in New York City. The Los Angeles premiere will also include a discussion by director John McDermott, Eddie Kramer, Experience Hendrix CEO Janie Hendrix, and Atlanta Pop Festival producer Steve Rash. From there, the film will continue with more openings in cities across the country for one or multiple-night runs starting on February 1st and continuing until April 3rd when the documentary arrives at The Avon Theatre Film Center in Stamford, Connecticut.

The film debuted on Showtime back in January 2017, and has since been released on home media. The film was directed by John McDermott, and features a mix of archival footage from the 1970 event, which is considered by many as the last of the great pop festivals from that era. Hendrix would tragically die at the age of 27 only a month-and-a-half following the event on September 18th, 1970.